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What is "Crushed" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 20-May-2023 (10 months, 28 days ago)
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Crushed
fabrics Fabrics which are treated with heat, moisture and pressure in finishing to distort pile formation.
Crushed
A finish that creates a planned irregular disturbance on the surface of the fabric, usually by mechanical means.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Crepon 66
Crepe effect appears in direction of the warp and achieved by alternate S and Z, or slack, tension, or different degrees of twist. Originally a wool crepe but now made of silk and rayon. It is much...
Backstrap Loom: An Insight Into the Timeless Textile ToolHistory and OriginThe Backstrap loom is a primitive textile tool, with its history rooted in ancient civilizations. Anthropological evidence...
The process of applying heat and moisture to fabrics. Steaming is used to fix dyes applied in continuous dyeing processes and printing. It is also used to 'fix' fabrics such as wool and silk and can...
Named after it's city of origin in France. It is identified by its raised woven pattern. This double-faced textile has a quilted appearance that is very elegant. Usually found in white, but other...
"Stretch in warp" is a term used in the textile industry to describe a specific characteristic or property of a fabric. It refers to the ability of a textile material to stretch or elongate along the...

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