TextileGlossary.com

What is "Curing" - Definition & Explanation

(Chemical Finishing) A process carried out after the application of a finish to a textile fabric in which appropriate conditions are used to effect a chemical reaction. Usually, the fabric is heat treated for several minutes. However, it may be subject to higher temperatures for short times (flash curing) or to low temperatures for longer periods and at higher regain (moist curing).
A baking process with the use of resin finishes, applying heat under carefully controlled conditions to a fabric or the garment, which cause a reaction in the finishing agents and make them work. Crease-retention, water repellency, wrinkle resistance, and durable press are examples of finishes that are cured.
a) A process that follows the addition of a finish to a textile fabric and in which appropriate conditions are used to effect a chemical reaction.

NOTE:

Heat treatment for several minutes is common, but higher temperatures for short times and high moisture regain (moist curing) are also used.

b) The vulcanisation of rubber, whether by the application of heat or by passing through cold sulphuryl chloride solution (cold cure).

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A design dominated by circular spots, which may be of any size, printed or woven into the fabric. Small dots are often called pin dots; medium to large dots may be referred to as aspirin dots, coin...
A method of printing by passing the fabric over metal rollers on which the design has been engraved. One roller is used for each color. Used for printing long runs with good register and a clear,...
Fiber sources are found in nature. That is, "any fiber that exists as such in the natural state." (TFPIA) Natural fibers used to create upholstery fabric include cotton, linen, hemp, silk and wool....
A tightly woven plain weave ribbed fabric with a hard slightly lustered surface. The ribbed effect is created by weaving a finer silk or manufactured warp yarn with a heavier filler yarn, usually...
A lightweight textile with a low thread count that is lustrous and has an uneven textural appearance. It was originally made of silk but is found today in wool, silk, rayon, acetate and other...

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