TextileGlossary.com

What is "Elasticity" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 18-Jan-2023 (1 year, 4 months, 10 days ago)
Share on FacebookShare on Twitter
Elasticity
Elasticity is a term used to describe the ability of a material to stretch and then return to its original shape and size when the stretching force is removed. In textiles, elasticity is an important factor in determining the comfort, fit, and performance of a garment or fabric.

Elasticity is often measured using a property called "elastic modulus" or "Young's modulus," which is defined as the ratio of the applied stress to the resulting strain. In simpler terms, it is a measure of how much a material can stretch before it breaks. The elastic modulus is influenced by the type of fiber used, the method of spinning and weaving, and any additional treatments the fabric may undergo.

Natural fibers such as cotton and wool have limited elasticity, meaning they do not stretch very much and do not always recover their original shape after being stretched. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester, on the other hand, have high elasticity and are often blended with natural fibers to improve the stretch and recovery properties of the fabric.

Elasticity is important in clothing because it affects the fit and comfort of the garment. Fabrics that have a high degree of elasticity, such as spandex or elastane, are often used in activewear or body-hugging clothing to provide a close fit and support without restricting movement. Fabrics with low elasticity, such as wool or cotton, are used in clothing that requires less stretch, such as jackets or pants.

Elasticity also plays a role in the durability and longevity of a fabric. Fabrics that are highly elastic may stretch out of shape or lose their elasticity over time, leading to a loose or baggy fit. Conversely, fabrics with limited elasticity may not be able to withstand the stresses of frequent stretching and may develop tears or holes.

The amount of elasticity a fabric has can be affected by the way it is woven or knitted. Fabrics that are tightly woven or knitted tend to have less elasticity, while those that are loosely woven or knitted tend to have more elasticity. Additional treatments such as heat-setting or chemical treatments can also affect the elasticity of a fabric.

In summary, elasticity is an important factor in determining the comfort, fit, and performance of a textile. It refers to the ability of a material to stretch and return to its original shape and size when the stretching force is removed. Elasticity is influenced by the type of fiber used, the method of spinning and weaving, and any additional treatments the fabric may undergo. Fabrics with high elasticity are often used in activewear or body-hugging clothing, while those with limited elasticity are used in clothing that requires less stretch. Elasticity also plays a role in the durability and longevity of a fabric, as highly elastic fabrics may stretch out of shape over time, while those with limited elasticity may develop tears or holes with frequent stretching.
Elasticity
The property of material to deform (usually to elongate) in proportion to the load applied and to recover its original shape when the load is release, i.e. the property of a material by virtue of which it tends to recover its original size and shape immediately after removal of the force causing deformation.
Elasticity
The extent of the ability of a stressed textile to recover its original size and shape immediately after removal of the stress.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Jumper 126
A jumper dress or simply jumper (British English: pinafore dress, pinafore, pinny), is a sleeveless, collarless dress intended to be worn over a blouse or sweater. There is sometimes confusion over...
To align strands of FILLING YARN and push them up close together as they are woven. The REED accomplishes this by advancing and receding from the cloth after each passage of the SHUTTLE, driving each...
Napped 43
Napped is a dry, permanent finish in which fibers are raised from the fabric by bristled rotating brushes. This finish allows the fabric to provide more insulation, while also lowering its resistance...
A type of finish applied to a textile fabric and that prevents the spreading of globules of water over its surface. NOTE: The term is normally not applied to a water-repellent finish that is...
A substrate refers to the underlying material or fabric on which various processes, treatments, or coatings are applied. It serves as the foundation or base upon which the desired functional or...

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

Companies for Elasticity:

If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Elasticity, please fill your company details below so that we can list your company for FREE! Send us the following details:
  • Company name
  • Company address
  • Attach a logo, if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2024 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap