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What is "Friction Calendering" - Definition & Explanation

The process of passing fabric through a calender in which a highly polished, usually heated steel bowl rotates at a higher surface speed than the softer (e.g. cotton-filled or paper-filled) bowl against which it works, thus producing a glaze on the face of the fabric that is in contact with the steel bowl.

NOTE:

The friction ratio is the ratio between the peripheral speed of the faster steel bowl and that of the slower bowl and is normally in the range 1:1 to 3:1.

A bright, shiny finish used on lining twills, sateen silesia, messaline and bind finish cloths. It is achieved when one calendar roller moves at a slightly increased speed over the other roller in the set. Rollers may or may not be heated.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

a) Any adventitious (unwanted) colour, owing to dye, dirt or iron, on textile material. NOTE: A severe stain is one that will resist processing. b) The fugitive or permanent colouring of material...
A process in which Teflon is chemically bonded to a fabric at a molecular level to create a water repellent and stain resistant finish. It is highly effective in that it does not change the hand or...
Fabrics and apparel with stretch and recovery in both warp and filling directions. Popular in ski-clothes, pants, active sportswear, and other body fitting apparel where free body movement is desired...
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Solvent for shellac products, will not thin most other coatings. Can be dissolved in water for cleaning. Can be used in alcohol type stoves and chafing dishes. Ethanol is available as denatured...

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