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What is "Lycra" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 01-Jan-2023 (1 year, 4 months, 29 days ago)
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Lycra
Lycra, also known as spandex or elastane, is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity. Developed in the 1950s by DuPont, Lycra has become an integral part of the textile industry, used in a variety of applications including athletic wear, swimwear, and lingerie.

Lycra is made from a polyurethane-based polymer, which is produced in a chemical process. The polymer is spun into a fiber, which is then woven or knitted into fabric. What makes Lycra unique is its ability to stretch up to seven times its original length without losing its shape. This makes it ideal for use in garments that require a high degree of stretch and recovery, such as compression garments and shapewear.

One of the major benefits of Lycra is its ability to improve the fit and comfort of garments. When added to fabrics, it can enhance the garment's ability to contour to the body, providing a more flattering and comfortable fit. Lycra is also resistant to damage from perspiration, oils, and lotions, making it a popular choice for athletic wear and swimwear.

Another benefit of Lycra is its versatility. It can be combined with a variety of other fibers, such as cotton, polyester, and nylon, to create fabrics with unique properties. For example, Lycra can be added to cotton to create a stretchy, comfortable fabric that is breathable and easy to care for. When combined with nylon, Lycra can create a strong, durable fabric that is ideal for use in high-performance garments.

Lycra has a wide range of applications, including in athletic wear, swimwear, lingerie, and hosiery. In athletic wear, Lycra is often used to create compression garments that help to improve performance and reduce muscle fatigue. It is also used in running tights, yoga pants, and other garments that require a high degree of stretch and recovery.

In swimwear, Lycra is used to create fabrics that are resistant to damage from chlorine and saltwater. It can also be used to create garments with a high degree of compression, which can help to enhance the body's natural curves and provide a more flattering fit.

In lingerie, Lycra is often used to create bras and other undergarments that are both supportive and comfortable. It is also used in hosiery, where it can help to create tights and stockings that fit snugly and comfortably without sagging or bagging.

One of the leading manufacturers of Lycra is the company Invista, which is a subsidiary of Koch Industries. Invista produces a range of Lycra products under the brand name LYCRA?, including Lycra T400?, which is designed to provide a higher level of stretch and recovery than traditional Lycra fibers.

Other major manufacturers of Lycra include DowDuPont, which produces Lycra fibers under the brand name THERMOLITE?, and Hyosung, which produces spandex fibers under the brand name creora?. These companies produce Lycra fibers for use in a variety of applications, from athletic wear and swimwear to lingerie and hosiery.

In conclusion, Lycra is a versatile and highly elastic fiber that has revolutionized the textile industry. Its ability to stretch up to seven times its original length without losing its shape makes it ideal for use in garments that require a high degree of stretch and recovery. With its wide range of applications and benefits, Lycra is likely to remain an important fiber in the textile industry for years to come.
Lycra
A DuPont trademark for its spandex fiber. Any time you see this fiber listed on a label, expect comfort, movement, and shape retention that won't wash away. Lycra increases the life of a garment, making it more sustainable. It adds stretch and versatility and contributes to a wider array of fashion fabrications.
Lycra
An elastomeric fiber that is blended with other fibers. Can stretch 500 percent without breaking. Holds dyes well and is resistant to heat. Trademark owned by Du Pont.
Lycra
A DuPont trademark for its spandex fiber. Any time you see this fiber listed on a label, expect comfort, movement, and shape retention that won't wash away.
Lycra
A spandex synthetic fiber. Lycra is very stretchy and is used in tight, body hugging garments like catsuits and sexy dresses.
Lycra
The elastic fiber made by Dupont. This fiber adds stretch and comfort to many clothing fabrics.
Lycra
Stretchy material made into shirts which keep ultraviolet rays from entering skin.

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