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What is "Parachute Fabric" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 07-Jan-2023 (1 year, 4 months, 23 days ago)
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Parachute Fabric
A compactly woven, lightweight fabric comparable with airplane cloth. It is made of silk, nylon, rayon, cotton, or polyester.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Pima 42
5/2 is a two-ply, mercerized, long staple cotton with 3,000 yds/lb. Pima is the finest cotton available. Pima's ability to resist pilling makes the garments more durable and longer lasting. Use Pima...
The combing process is an additional step beyond carding. In this process the fibers are arranged in a highly parallel form, and additional short fibers are removed, producing high quality yarns with...
Velour 38
A Knit Or Woven Fabric With A Soft , Short Thick Nap Made By Brushing And Shearing. Knit Velours Are Used In Women's Tops And Sportswear. Wovens Are Usually Heavier In Weight And Used For Coats,...
Denim 138
Denim - Denim's original birthplace was Nimes' France and it was originally called 'Serge de Nimes', Hence the name denim Today' the United States is the largest producer of denim fabric and and Cone...
In textiles, extensibility refers to the ability of a fabric to stretch or elongate under stress. This property is important in many applications, including clothing, upholstery, and industrial...

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