TextileGlossary.com

What is "Wyzenbeek Test" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 07-Apr-2023 (1 year, 1 month, 23 days ago)
Share on FacebookShare on Twitter
Wyzenbeek Test
The Wyzenbeek test is a standardized method used to measure the abrasion resistance of textiles. It is named after its inventor, Joseph Wyzenbeek, and is widely used in the textile industry to determine the durability of fabrics. The test involves rubbing a piece of fabric with a standardized piece of abrasive material, typically a wire mesh or sandpaper, and measuring the number of rubs required to wear through the fabric.

The Wyzenbeek test is used to determine the suitability of fabrics for high-traffic areas such as upholstery, drapery, and automotive interiors. It is also used to evaluate the performance of fabrics used in commercial and contract settings, such as hotels, restaurants, and hospitals. The test is conducted using a Wyzenbeek machine, which is a mechanical device that simulates the wear and tear that fabrics are subjected to in real-world situations.

The Wyzenbeek test measures the abrasion resistance of fabrics by subjecting them to a specified number of rubs. The test is conducted by placing a sample of the fabric over a metal platform and attaching it to the Wyzenbeek machine. The abrasive material is then attached to a rubbing head that moves back and forth across the surface of the fabric. The number of rubs required to wear through the fabric is recorded, and the results are reported as a rating.

The rating system used in the Wyzenbeek test is based on the number of rubs required to wear through the fabric. The higher the rating, the more durable the fabric is considered to be. A rating of 15,000 rubs or higher is generally considered to be suitable for commercial and contract use, while a rating of 30,000 rubs or higher is recommended for high-traffic areas such as upholstery.

In addition to measuring the abrasion resistance of fabrics, the Wyzenbeek test can also be used to evaluate other properties such as colorfastness, seam slippage, and pilling. Colorfastness is measured by subjecting the fabric to a series of rubs with a wet or dry cloth, and evaluating the amount of color transfer. Seam slippage is evaluated by measuring the amount of force required to pull a seam apart, while pilling is evaluated by rubbing the fabric with a standardized abrasive material and measuring the amount of fuzz or pills that are generated.

In conclusion, the Wyzenbeek test is a standardized method used to measure the abrasion resistance of textiles. It is widely used in the textile industry to determine the durability of fabrics, particularly in high-traffic areas such as upholstery, drapery, and automotive interiors. The test is conducted using a mechanical device that simulates the wear and tear that fabrics are subjected to in real-world situations. The results of the test are reported as a rating, based on the number of rubs required to wear through the fabric. In addition to measuring abrasion resistance, the test can also be used to evaluate other properties such as colorfastness, seam slippage, and pilling.
Wyzenbeek Test
Abrasion test for fabric.. Fabric is pulled taut and rubbed in both the warp and filling directions, using a piece of cotton duck fabric as the abradant. The number of cycles, or double rubs, endured before the fabric shows "noticeable wear" is counted and determines the fabric's abrasion rating.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A crisp, sheer, lightweight plain-weave fabric, with a medium to high yarn count, made of silk, rayon, nylon, or polyester. The fabric is used primarily in evening and wedding apparel for women. It...
Slub 43
(woven fabric) - usually caused by an extra piece of yarn that is woven into fabric. It can also be caused by thick places in the yarn. Often is caused by fly waste being spun in yarn in the...
General term for a chair with a wooden seat and separate leg assembly and spindle back. Originated in the 17 century around Windsor, England and also popular in America. For other types of chairs,...
Fabric that has been processed by dyeing, printing, applying of special resins and finishes, and is ready for market. Finishing: The process of dyeing, printing, etc.. of greige goods....
Burlap 37
Coarse, canvas-like fabric usually made of jute, but can be made of hemp, or cotton. Sometimes called gunny. Used primarily for bale coverings and sacks and bags. Also used in furniture, drapery,...

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

Companies for Wyzenbeek Test:

If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Wyzenbeek Test, please fill your company details below so that we can list your company for FREE! Send us the following details:
  • Company name
  • Company address
  • Attach a logo, if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2024 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap