TextileGlossary.com

What is "Vegetable tanning" - Definition & Explanation

Vegetable tanning refers to the use of natural tannins to create usable leather from hides. Natural tannins are present in bark, wood, leaves and fruits of chestnut, oak and hemlock trees. This process is time intensive, as it can take up to three weeks for the tannins to fully penetrate a hide. From an ecological perspective, vegetable tanning is preferable, however the leather produced is not stable in water as it shrivels and becomes brittle.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The density of a material divided by the density of water. Expressed as a number greater than 0. Materials with specific gravity less than 1.00 will float and materials with specific gravity greater...
A non-metallic mineral fiber which is not flammable. The fiber is woven into fabrics and used for theater curtains, ironing board covers, potholders, and other cloths where flameproof and heatproof...
A manufactured fiber in which the fiber-forming substance is any long chain synthetic polymer composed of at least 85% by weight of an ester of a substituted aromatic carboxylic acid, including but...
The application of a size mixture to warp yarn. The purpose of this is to make the yarn smoother and stronger to withstand the strain of weaving, to provide an acceptable hand in the woven gray...
The production of a layer of protruding fibres on the surface of fabrics by brushing, teazling or rubbing. NOTE: The fabric, in open width, is passed between rotating rollers covered with teazles,...

Companies for Vegetable tanning:


If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Vegetable tanning, please fill your company details below so that we can list our company for FREE!

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2017 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap