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What is "Bandanna" - Definition & Explanation

A Print Design Characterized By White Or Brightly Colored Motifs On A Dark Or Bright Ground, Most Often Red Or Navy. Done By Discharge Or Resist Printing But Originally Done In India By Tie Dyeing. 2. A Fabric, Usually Cotton With Such A Design.
A kerchief (from the French couvre-chef, "cover the head") is a triangular or square piece of cloth tied around the head or around the neck for protective or decorative purposes. In India, a "hand kerchief" primarily refers to a napkin made of cloth, used to maintain personal hygiene. A bandana (from the Hindi bandhana, "to tie") is a type of large, usually colorful, kerchief, usually used as head gear. Bandanas are frequently printed in a Paisley Pattern.
A large and brightly colored handkerchief; often used as a neckerchief .

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The act of punching holes in JACQUARD CARDS according to a pattern or DESIGN DRAFT, so that when they are set up in the LOOM, they will control the weaving mechanism and the pattern will be woven...
Silk, the fabric that makes its own statement. Say "silk" to someone and what do they visualize? No other fabric generates quite the same reaction. For centuries silk has had a reputation as a...
The process of dyeing fiber prior to formation into yarns. Very high fastness dyes can be used and there is less pressure on getting color exactly right since batches can be blended prior to yarn...
From the French for "cat's eye." The luster of a piece of wood with a finish on it. Also known as luster or depth, chatoyance displays itself by the figure changing with different viewing angles and...
A method of coloring fabric made with strategically placed yarns of 2 or more different fibers. A pre-planned effect becomes visible by dyeing the fabric in different dye baths, one for each of the...

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