TextileGlossary.com

What is "Plaid" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 17-Apr-2023 (1 year, 5 days ago)
Share on FacebookShare on Twitter
Plaid
Plaid is a textile pattern characterized by a crisscrossing of horizontal and vertical lines of different widths and colors, forming squares or rectangles of different sizes. It is a traditional pattern that has been used in many cultures for centuries, but it is most commonly associated with Scotland, where it is known as tartan.

The pattern is created by weaving different colored threads in a particular sequence to create a repeating pattern. The colors and sizes of the squares can vary depending on the specific plaid design. The most common colors used in plaid patterns are red, blue, green, yellow, and black, but other colors can also be used.

Plaid has been used in a variety of textile products, including clothing, accessories, and home decor. In clothing, plaid is commonly used for shirts, skirts, dresses, and jackets. It is also commonly used for scarves, ties, and other accessories. In home decor, plaid is used for blankets, curtains, and upholstery fabric.

The history of plaid can be traced back to ancient times, when it was used by various cultures for different purposes. In Scotland, plaid was originally used as a way to distinguish between different clans or families. Each clan had its own unique plaid pattern, and it was used to identify members of the clan.

During the 18th and 19th centuries, plaid became more popular in Europe and America. It was used in clothing and home decor, and it became a symbol of the Scottish culture. In the 20th century, plaid became associated with various subcultures, including punk rock and grunge.

There are many different types of plaid patterns, each with its own unique history and meaning. Some of the most popular plaid patterns include the Black Watch, the Royal Stewart, and the Dress Gordon. The Black Watch plaid is named after the famous Scottish regiment, and it features a dark blue and green pattern. The Royal Stewart plaid is the personal tartan of the British royal family, and it features a red, green, and blue pattern. The Dress Gordon plaid is named after the Duke of Gordon, and it features a yellow, green, and blue pattern.

In conclusion, plaid is a textile pattern characterized by a crisscrossing of horizontal and vertical lines of different widths and colors, forming squares or rectangles of different sizes. It is a traditional pattern that has been used for centuries, and it is most commonly associated with Scotland. Plaid has been used in a variety of textile products, including clothing, accessories, and home decor. There are many different types of plaid patterns, each with its own unique history and meaning.
Plaid
A pattern consisting of colored bars or stripes which cross each other at right angles, comparable with a Scottish tartan. Plaid infers a multi-colored motif of rather large pattern repeat; the word "check" refers to similar motifs on a small scale and with fewer colors.
Plaid
A twilled woolen fabric with a tartan pattern; a fabric with a pattern of tartan or an imitation of tartan. A rectangular length of tartan worn over the left shoulder as part of the Scottish national costume.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Hip pockets are a type of pocket found on many garments, including pants, shorts, and skirts. They are typically located on the sides of the garment and are designed to provide a convenient and...
A woven fabric construction made by interlacing two or more sets of warp yarns with two or more sets of filling yarns. The most common double weave fabrics are made using a total of either four or...
Bycast 550
Bycast leather, also known as split-grain leather or PU leather, is a type of synthetic leather material commonly used in the textile industry. It is a versatile and cost-effective alternative to...
A specialty yarn, characterized by a pile protruding on all sides, resembling a caterpillar. The yarn is produced by first weaving a fabric with a cotton or linen warp and a silk, wool, rayon, or...
Jaspe 34
A woven fabric with a series of faint stripes formed by the arrangement of light, medium, and dark warp yarns or by twisting together 2 yarns of different colors. Used for drapery, upholstery,...

Add a definition

Add a definition for a textile term that you know about! Send us an email & tell us:
  • The term you want to define
  • Its definition in 500 words or less
  • Attach an image if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

Companies for Plaid:

If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Plaid, please fill your company details below so that we can list your company for FREE! Send us the following details:
  • Company name
  • Company address
  • Attach a logo, if necessary.
  • Optionally, tell us about yourself in 200 words or less!

(s) 2024 TextileGlossary.com Some rights reserved. • Sitemap