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What is "Stop Mark" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 16-Feb-2023 (1 year, 4 months, 8 days ago)
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Stop Mark
In the textile industry, a "stop mark" refers to a temporary marking or indication made on a fabric during the manufacturing process to identify specific areas that need to be modified, adjusted or corrected. These marks are usually made with a special pen or chalk and are used as a guide for the sewing machine operator or cutter to make adjustments.

Stop marks are critical in ensuring the quality and accuracy of the final product, especially in industries such as garment making. For example, stop marks are commonly used in the production of pants or skirts to indicate the exact location for hemming or adjustments to the length. In the case of pattern making, stop marks are used to indicate where the pattern pieces should be aligned, or where specific design elements should be placed.

There are different types of stop marks that can be used in the textile industry. One type is a straight line, which is often used to indicate the end of a seam or the location where a pocket or zipper should be placed. Another type of stop mark is a dot, which is used to indicate the center point of a buttonhole or the location for a button.

The use of stop marks is not limited to just apparel manufacturing. In the production of home textiles such as curtains, stop marks are used to indicate where the fabric should be pleated or hemmed. In the manufacturing of upholstery, stop marks are used to indicate where fabric should be cut or sewn.

Top users of stop marks in the textile industry are garment manufacturers, textile mills, and pattern makers. Garment manufacturers use stop marks extensively during the production process to ensure the accuracy and quality of their products. Textile mills use stop marks to indicate where to cut the fabric or where specific design elements should be placed. Pattern makers use stop marks to indicate where to place the pattern pieces on the fabric, or where to make adjustments.

Stop marks can be made using different types of marking tools, such as fabric chalk, pens, or specialized markers. Some marking tools can be removed with water or heat, while others are more permanent. The choice of marking tool will depend on the specific needs of the manufacturer or the type of fabric being used.

In addition to manual stop marks, some textile manufacturers are beginning to use digital stop marks to enhance the accuracy and efficiency of their production processes. Digital stop marks are created using specialized software and can be printed directly onto the fabric using a digital printer. This method can save time and increase accuracy by eliminating the need for manual markings.

In conclusion, stop marks are an important tool used in the textile industry to ensure the accuracy and quality of finished products. They provide a guide for manufacturers and operators to make adjustments and modifications during the production process. Top users of stop marks include garment manufacturers, textile mills, and pattern makers, and they are made using a variety of marking tools. With the emergence of digital technology, the use of digital stop marks is becoming more prevalent in the textile industry.
Stop Mark
When the loom is stopped, the yarn elongates under tension; when the loom starts again, the slack is woven into the fabric.

Some other terms

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