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What is "Abaca" - Definition & Explanation

A banana-like plant (Musa textilis) native to the Philippines which has broad leaves with long stalks. The fibres obtained from the stalks are used to make cordage, fabric, and paper. (Also called manila and manila hemp. ).
A vegetable leaf fiber derived from the Musa textilis plant. It is mainly grown in the Philippines but is also found, in smaller amounts, in Africa, Malaysia, Indonesia and Costa Rica. The fiber is obtained from the outer layer of the leaf. Processing occurs when it is separated mechanically into lengths varying from 3 to 9 feet. Abaca is very strong and has great luster. It is very resistant to damage from salt water.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A fiber dyeing method in which dye in applied to combed fibers in an untwisted or loosely twisted rope form (called top or sliver ). Sometimes dye is applied or printed on the fiber at regular...
A wood repair using a solid fill, usually shellac, lacquer or related resins, heated and melted with a hot blade and flowed into a defect. The blade is called a burn-in knife and is heated...
A fabric produced by interlocking loops in a lengthwise direction. Warp knits tend to be flatter, smoother, more run resistant, and more stable than weft knits. Examples are tricot, raschel and...
A ketone solvent. A highly volatile, aromatic, flammable and moderately toxic selective solvent. Ingredient in nail polish remover, some paint strippers, and most lacquer thinners. Miscible in water....
A lightweight, plain weave, fabric, made from cotton, rayon, or acetate, and characterized by a puckered striped effect, usually in the warp direction. The crinkled effect is created through the...

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