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What is "Burn-in" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 20-Mar-2023 (11 months, 6 days ago)
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Burn-in
A wood repair using a solid fill, usually shellac, lacquer or related resins, heated and melted with a hot blade and flowed into a defect. The blade is called a burn-in knife and is heated electrically, by a butane flame, or over an alcohol lamp.

Some other terms

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