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What is "Oilcloth" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 30-Mar-2023 (1 year, 1 month, 30 days ago)
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Oilcloth: A Detailed Study of Its Composition and Application


The History and Types of Oilcloth

Oilcloth, as its name implies, is a type of cloth treated with oil to make it waterproof. Its origins date back to the 18th century when sailors covered discarded sails with linseed oil to create waterproof tarpaulins. This material quickly found its way into domestic use, proving popular for floor cloths and table coverings due to its water resistance.

There are two main types of oilcloth, each with unique properties. Traditional oilcloth, made by treating lightweight cotton with a layer of boiled linseed oil, is known for its robustness and high level of water resistance. Modern oilcloth, on the other hand, is made by coating a cotton mesh with PVC, making it easier to clean but less hard-wearing.

Handling Oilcloth

While oilcloth is relatively low maintenance, it does require specific care to prolong its lifespan. It's not suitable for machine washing or dry cleaning - instead, it should be cleaned with a damp cloth and mild detergent. Furthermore, oilcloth should not be folded as this can cause the material to crack. When storing, it is recommended to roll the cloth to avoid damage.

Key International Manufacturers and Users

  • Freudenberg Performance Materials: An international manufacturer producing technical textiles including oilcloth.
  • Cath Kidston: A British retailer known for its distinctive floral prints on a range of products, including oilcloth bags and accessories.
  • Marimekko: A Finnish lifestyle design company well-known for its original prints and colours, one of which is oilcloth.
  • Mexican Oilcloth: A company that focuses on vibrant and unique oilcloth designs.
  • Oilcloth By The Yard: A US-based company that sells a wide range of oilcloth products and patterns.

Applications of Oilcloth

  • Home Dcor: Due to its waterproof quality, oilcloth is popularly used for tablecloths, aprons, and other home dcor items.
  • Bags and Accessories: Oilcloth's durability and easy-clean properties make it a favorite for making bags, purses, and other accessories.
  • Outdoor Gear: From tents to raincoats, oilcloth's water resistance makes it suitable for various outdoor applications.

In conclusion, oilcloth's history is deeply rooted in its practicality, and its unique features make it a favorite choice in various sectors, from fashion to home dcor. By understanding its properties and learning to handle it properly, users can ensure they fully enjoy the benefits it offers.


Oilcloth
Oilcloth was, traditionally, heavy cotton or linen cloth with a linseed oil coating: it was semi-waterproof. The most familiar use was for brightly printed kitchen tablecloths. Dull-colored oilcloth was used for bedrolls, sou'westers, and tents. By the late 1950s, oilcloth became a synonym for vinyl (polyvinyl chloride) bonded to either a flanneled cloth or a printed vinyl with a synthetic non-woven backing.
Oilcloth
A general term for any oil coated fabric.
Oilcloth
Oilcloth was, traditionally, heavy cotton or linen cloth with a linseed oil coating: it was semi-water-proof. The most familiar use was for brightly printed kitchen tablecloths. Dull colored oilcloth was used for bedrolls, sou'westers, and tents. By the late 1950's, oilcloth became a synonym for vinyl (polyvinyl chloride) bonded to a flanneled cloth.
Oilcloth
Originally, textiles such as cotton were coated in oil to create resistance to moisture. Now, resins from plastics are used instead of oil. Olefin is a very versatile fiber with excellent flexibility. In the past, oilcloth was used for waterproof garments. Oilcloth is another historical fabric that has been replaced by synthetics and more modern fabrics.
Oilcloth
Cloth treated with oil or paint and used for table and shelf coverings.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Skort 494
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Fabric that has been processed by dyeing, printing, applying of special resins and finishes, and is ready for market. Finishing: The process of dyeing, printing, etc.. of greige goods....
The property of material to deform (usually to elongate) in proportion to the load applied and to recover its original shape when the load is release, i.e. the property of a material by virtue of...
The term "Awning Stripe" refers to a specific type of pattern commonly used in textiles, characterized by bold, horizontal stripes of equal width. The design is inspired by traditional awnings used...
Union dyed, also known as yarn dyed or piece dyed, is a dyeing technique used in the textile industry to color fibers, yarns, or fabrics before they are woven or knitted into the final product....

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