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What is "Sheraton" - Definition & Explanation

Sheraton is a late 18th century neoclassical English furniture style, in vogue ca 1785 - 1800, that was named afterwards (by 19th century collectors and dealers) to credit furniture designer Thomas Sheraton, whose books of engraved designs capture this style. Sheraton style employs slender lightweight forms, using satinwood, mahogany or painted finishes. Without pedantic archaeology, it brought the Neo-Classical taste of architects like Robert Adam within reach of the middle class. In

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Basting is the process of temporarily sewing or pinning fabric together. This can be done by hand or by machine. Quilters use basting to temporarily position applique pieces. They also baste the top,...
A sleeveless short top that is held in place by a narrow band of cloth that goes around the back of the neck. Halter tops usually tie, hook, or clasp behind the neck and across the back, leaving the...
Adhesives are an essential part of the manufacturing process for a variety of apparel applications ranging from applying labels, decorative trim and waterproofing tapes to innovative solutions like...
Silk fabric brocaded with silver and gold. The metal thread used for brocading is made from a fine strand of flattened metal wound over a core of silk, using yellow silk under gold, and white silk...
A fabric whose weave is made up of 2 or 3 warp yarns or threads to every one weft. Weave with diagonal ribs and large number of variations. Diagonals may be set at sharp or blunt angles, may be...

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