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What is "Sheraton" - Definition & Explanation

Sheraton is a late 18th century neoclassical English furniture style, in vogue ca 1785 - 1800, that was named afterwards (by 19th century collectors and dealers) to credit furniture designer Thomas Sheraton, whose books of engraved designs capture this style. Sheraton style employs slender lightweight forms, using satinwood, mahogany or painted finishes. Without pedantic archaeology, it brought the Neo-Classical taste of architects like Robert Adam within reach of the middle class. In

Some other terms

Some more terms:

A process of passing cloths between one or more rollers (or calenders), usually under carefully controlled heat and pressure, to produce a variety of surface effects or textures in a fabric such as...
The crimped, rippled, wavy or pebbled appearance of a fabric where distortion of the structure has occurred as the result of non-uniform relaxation or shrinkage. NOTE: This defect may result from...
A ballgown is a type of long dress that is fitted at the bodice, with a very full skirt. This is the most formal dress silhouette, usually reserved for the dressiest of occasions. The ballgown looks...
A brocade-like pattern effect created on the fabric through the application of a chemical, instead of color, during the burn-out printing process. (Sulfuric acid, mixed into a colorless print paste,...
A straight-edge whose function is to remove surplus material (e.g. filling, coating material, printing paste) from the surface of the rollers used to apply the material or from a fabric surface to...

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