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What is "Sheraton" - Definition & Explanation

Sheraton is a late 18th century neoclassical English furniture style, in vogue ca 1785 - 1800, that was named afterwards (by 19th century collectors and dealers) to credit furniture designer Thomas Sheraton, whose books of engraved designs capture this style. Sheraton style employs slender lightweight forms, using satinwood, mahogany or painted finishes. Without pedantic archaeology, it brought the Neo-Classical taste of architects like Robert Adam within reach of the middle class. In

Some other terms

Some more terms:

a) An immersion of relatively short duration of a textile in a liquid. b) The depth of liquor in the inner cylinder of a rotating-cage washing machine. c) A term sometimes used to describe the...
The process of conferring dimensional stability on fibres, yarns or fabrics, generally by means of moist or dry heat. NOTE: The operation of setting is applied to textile materials of all kinds but...
A Finishing Process That Produces A High Gloss On The Surface On The Fabric By Passing It Through Heavy Rollers (calendering) . Fabrics Made Of Thermoplastic Fibers Like Nylon Or Polyester Are Cired...
Beadwork is the art or craft of attaching beads to one another or to cloth using a needle and thread. Most beadwork takes the form of jewelry or other personal adornment, but beads are also used in...
A silk muslin that is sheer, open, and lightweight. It is something like chiffon but with a crisp finish produced by sizing. It does not wear well and it does not launder. Used in evening wear, and...

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