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What is "Sheraton" - Definition & Explanation

Sheraton is a late 18th century neoclassical English furniture style, in vogue ca 1785 - 1800, that was named afterwards (by 19th century collectors and dealers) to credit furniture designer Thomas Sheraton, whose books of engraved designs capture this style. Sheraton style employs slender lightweight forms, using satinwood, mahogany or painted finishes. Without pedantic archaeology, it brought the Neo-Classical taste of architects like Robert Adam within reach of the middle class. In

Some other terms

Some more terms:

The device (similar to a showerhead) which forms strands of filament as molten polymer is pumped through. It is at this stage that the fiber cross section, fiber size and the number of filaments in a...
A method of producing nonwoven fabric in a continuous process. Polymer is extruded through a spinneret and the resulting filaments are cooled and laid down in a web along a continuous conveyor belt....
Cellophane is a thin, transparent sheet made of processed cellulose. Cellulose fibres from wood or cotton are dissolved in alkali to make a solution called viscose, which is then extruded through a...
A sock is a baglike covering for the foot and/or lower leg, which is designed to ease chafing between the foot to keep the feet warm and absorb sweat from the feet. Sock lengths vary, from covering...
A very fine, all-silk tulle which originated in France. It has a cobweb appearance. Hexagonal open mesh. Made in 52 inch and 72 inch widths. Used in veils, particularly for weddings, trimmings....

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