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What is "Deep Pinning" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 01-Apr-2023 (1 year, 1 month, 29 days ago)
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Deep Pinning
Deep pinning is a technique used in textile manufacturing that involves inserting pins into fabric at a depth that is greater than the standard seam allowance. This technique is used to create a stronger and more durable seam, as the pins help to hold the fabric together more securely.

The deep pinning technique is often used in the production of heavy-duty textiles, such as canvas, denim, and other rugged fabrics that are subjected to heavy use and wear. By using deep pinning, manufacturers can create a seam that is stronger and more resistant to tearing or fraying, which can help to extend the life of the garment or other textile product.

The process of deep pinning involves inserting pins into the fabric at a depth that is greater than the standard seam allowance. Typically, pins are inserted at a depth of around 1/4 inch (6 mm) beyond the seam allowance, which helps to hold the fabric together more securely. Once the pins are in place, the fabric is sewn together using a heavy-duty sewing machine or other equipment that is designed to handle the thicker, more durable fabrics that are often used in deep pinning.

One of the key benefits of deep pinning is its ability to create a stronger and more durable seam. This is particularly important in applications where the fabric is subjected to heavy use or wear, as a weaker seam can easily tear or fray over time. By using deep pinning, manufacturers can create a seam that is more resistant to damage, which can help to extend the life of the garment or other textile product.

Another benefit of deep pinning is its ability to improve the appearance of the finished product. Because the pins hold the fabric together more securely, the seam is less likely to shift or distort during the sewing process. This can help to create a cleaner, more uniform appearance, which is important in many applications, such as fashion apparel, where the appearance of the finished product is a key consideration.

Top users of the deep pinning technique include manufacturers of heavy-duty textiles, such as canvas, denim, and workwear. Companies that specialize in outdoor gear and equipment, such as camping and hiking gear, also frequently use deep pinning in the production of their products, as they need to create textiles that are durable and long-lasting.

One manufacturer that is known for their use of deep pinning is Carhartt, a company that specializes in workwear and outdoor clothing. Carhartt is known for their use of heavy-duty fabrics and construction techniques, including deep pinning, to create products that are rugged and durable. They use this technique in the production of many of their products, including their signature work pants and jackets.

Another manufacturer that uses deep pinning is Filson, a company that specializes in outdoor clothing and accessories. Filson is known for their use of high-quality materials and construction techniques, and deep pinning is a key part of their manufacturing process. They use this technique in the production of many of their products, including their canvas and leather bags, which are designed to withstand the rigors of outdoor use.

In conclusion, deep pinning is a technique used in textile manufacturing to create a stronger and more durable seam. It involves inserting pins into the fabric at a depth that is greater than the standard seam allowance, which helps to hold the fabric together more securely. This technique is often used in the production of heavy-duty textiles, such as canvas, denim, and workwear, and is employed by manufacturers that specialize in outdoor gear and equipment. Top users of the deep pinning technique include Carhartt and Filson, two companies that are known for their high-quality products and use of durable materials and construction techniques.
Deep Pinning
Conspicuous pin-stenter marks in the body of the fabric (i.e. clear of the selvedge), and that therefore reduce the usable width of the fabric.

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