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What is "Block-front" - Definition & Explanation
Last Updated on: 15-Jan-2023 (1 year, 4 months, 13 days ago)
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Block-front
Technical method of constructing the fronts of case furniture, such as chests or cabinets. Featuring three flattened curves, the concave flanked by convex. Developed in America, especially in New England in the 18th century. Compare with break front.

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