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What is "Cambrian Tweed" - Definition & Explanation

Rough woollen fabric made in the uplands of Mid-Wales from the local hardy sheep. Plain weave, hopsack, or herringbone weaves are the most usual and the yarns are either dyed with synthetic dyes for better fastness or, more attractively, left in their natural colours of white, grey and black (al-though the sheep in the field look brown), and mixed together. Used for hardwearing clothes such as men's suits, sports jackets, Norfolk skirts and jackets. The coarser yarn is made into rugs.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

(also known as polyolefin and Olefin) - A manufactured fiber characterized by its light weight, high strength, and abrasion resistance. Polypropylene is also good at transporting moisture, creating a...
The production of spun yarns by a process in which the sliver (q.v.) or roving (q.v.) is opened or separated into its individual fibres or tufts and is subsequently reassembled in the spinning...
Certain treatments to achieve a desired effect or performance, dry being those applied mechanically. Dry finishes are generally considered environmentally preferable and consumer friendly as they use...
One of the oldest textile fibers known. Though the fiber and the fabric are both commonly known as linen, it is actually flax, the fiber of the Linum plant. Linen is generally favored for its fine,...
The process of dyeing finished garments. Benefits are that colour decisions can be left until the last minute (reducing manufacture of unwanted merchandise) and you only dye the fabric in the garment...

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