TextileGlossary.com

What is "Wool" - Definition & Explanation

Fiber from sheep, goats, camels ;-), alpaca, llama, or other animals. Sheared wool comes from live animals. Pulled wool comes from pelts of slaughtered animals. Reused wool comes from worn clothing. Reprocessed wool comes from scraps of new fabric.
Usually associated with fiber or fabric made from the fleece of sheep or lamb. However, the term "wool" can also apply to all animal hair fibers, including the hair of the Cashmere or Angora goat or the specialty hair fibers of the camel, alpaca, llama, or vicuna. Commonly used in slacks and outerwear.
Fibers that grow on the sheep fleece. There are varieties of wool such as Alpaca, Angora, Botany, Cashmere, Merino and Shetland.
A protein fiber usually associated with fiber or fabric made from the fleece of sheep or lambs. However, the term 'wool' can also apply to all animal hair fibers, including the hair of the Cashmere or Angora goat or the specialty hair fibers of the camel, alpaca, llama, or vicuna. Wool is very resilient and resistant to wrinkling. It is renewed by moisture and well known for its warmth. It absorbs and releases moisture slowly, which allows excellent insulating capabilities and breathability. It can even hold 30% of its own weight without feeling damp.
Wool is the fiber derived from the hair of domesticated animals, usually sheep.
(Eco Wool) – Sheared from free range roaming sheep that have not been subjected to toxic flea dipping, and have not been treated with chemicals, dyes, or bleaches. Eco wool comes in natural tones of white, grey and black.
Wool-like - Refers to a non-wool fabric with a warm hand that feels like natural wool.
Wool fabric brings to mind cozy warmth. Some wools are scratchy giving some people the idea that they are "allergic" to wool. Although wool fiber comes from a variety of animal coats, not all wool’s are scratchy but rather extremely soft. The wool fibers have crimps or curls which create pockets and gives the wool a spongy feel and creates insulation for the wearer. The outside surface of the fiber consists of a series of serrated scales which overlap each other much like the scales of a fish. Wool is the only fiber with such serration’s which make it possible for the fibers to cling together and produce felt. The same serration’s will also cling together tightly when wool is improperly washed and shrinks! Wool will not only return to its original position after being stretched or creased, it will absorb up to 30% of its weight in moisture without feeling damp. Its unique properties allow shaping and tailoring, making the wool the most popular fabric for tailoring fine garments. Wool is also dirt resistant, flame resistant, and, in many weaves, resists wear and tearing.

Basically, there are two different processes used in wool production. Woolen fabrics have a soft feel and fuzzy surface, very little shine or sheen, will not hold a crease, and are heavier and bulkier than worsteds. Blankets, scarves, coating, and some fabrics are considered woolens. Worsted wool is smoother than woolen, takes shine more easily, does not sag, holds a crease well, is lighter and less bulky, and wears longer than woolen. Worsted wool’s require a greater number of processes, during which fibers are arranged parallel to each other. The smoother, harder-surface worsted yarns produce smoother fabrics with a minimum of fuzziness and nap. Fine worsted wool is even seen in clothing for athletics such as tennis. No, they are not hotter than polyester but actually cooler, as the weave of the fabric allows wool to absorb perspiration and the fabric "breathes," unlike polyester.

Made from sheep, most famous being Merino wool
a fabric made from the hair of sheep
fiber sheared from animals (such as sheep) and twisted into yarn for weaving
outer coat of especially sheep and yaks
Usually associated with fiber or fabric made from the fleece of sheep or lamb. However, the term "wool" can also apply to all animal hair fibers, including the hair of the Cashmere or Angora goat or the specialty hair fibers of the camel, alpaca, llama, or vicuna.

Some other terms

Some more terms:

Rupture of individual filaments (usually during winding or weaving) that results in the appearance of a fibrous or hairy surface, which may be localised or general, in a fabric made from flat...
A waxy or oiled-finished leather These leathers lighten when stretched, bent, or "pulled up". They are categorized as natural because they do not have a thick top coat. They have a nice hand, and...
A process which reduces the linear density of an assembly of fibres. Drafting typically occurs in the early stages of producing yarns from staple fibres. Draw spinning: A process for spinning...
Usually a fluorochemical custom soil-resistant fabric treatment for upholstered furniture. The fabric treatment is odorless and does not affect the feel of a fabric. What it does is increase the...
A Yarn Formed From An Elastomer., Note 1: Elastomeric Yarn May Either Be Incorporated Into Fabric In The Bare State Or Wrapped With Relatively Inextensible Fibres. Wrapping Is Done By Covering (see...

Companies for Wool:


If you manufacture, distribute or otherwise deal in Wool, please fill your company details below so that we can list our company for FREE!